Baltimore Daguerreans, S-Z

compiled by Ross J. Kelbaugh

©Historic Graphics, 1998

*CLICK ON LINKED NAMES FOR EXAMPLES



SCOTT, EDWARD R., daguerreotypist.

85 Baltimore (1854); 87 Baltimore (1855-1856). TS, January 22, 1854, CD.

SEIXEAS (SEIXAS),_________, daguerreotypist.

Pioneer daguerrean who opened the first daguerreotype exhibition in Baltimore and demonstrated its procedures. TS, April 1840.

SHAW,__________, operator in the gallery of P.L. Perkins.

"Mr. Shaw, who has been operating at this establishment, is a good workman and fully understands his business." PFAJ, 1857.

SHEW, JACOB, daguerreotypist.

Manager of John Plumbe's National Gallery in Baltimore (1843?-April 1846); 117 Baltimore (May 1846-March 1850); formed partnership with Harvey R. Marks who operated their gallery while Shew traveled to California (April 1849-1850); Marks assumed control of the studio (April 1850); opened gallery in Sacramento, California (1854). CD, TS, BA, AD. (see H.R. Marks)

Labels: Embossed miniature case pad "SHEW'S GALLERY/ 117 BALTIMORE ST./ BALTIMORE"; blind-stamp on mat "SHEW & MARKS".

New Photographic Rooms.-- Mr. J. Shew, a gentleman who attained great proficiency in his art whilst acting as superintendent of Prof. Plumbe's office in this city, has recently . . . commenced business for himself. His rooms-- on the second floor of the fine buildings erected at the S.W. corner of Baltimore and South streets-- are furnished with much good taste, and have an air of neatness and comfort well calculated to make the stay of his visitors pleasant. His facilities for taking faithful daguerreotypes, the light being every way adapted to the purpose, are equal to those of any other photographer, as his gallery, yet small, but daily increasing, will show. He has made preparations for taking miniatures of children, which he states are superior to those of any other establishment in the city. The visitor to Mr. SHEW'S rooms will be particularly struck with a large likeness of Hon. JOHN P. KENNEDY, strictly correct in every particular, and as Iife-like as any we have ever seen. The imperfections of the art are fast giving way in the hands of such skillful operators as PLUMBE and SHEW, and any one who desires it may now procure a facsimile of himself, which the most unobservant in such matters cannot fall to recognize at a glance. BA, May 14, 1846.

Daguerrian Galleries-- A Daguerreotype, well taken, clear, distinct in outline, and naturally reflecting form, face and feature, is not so often to be had, that when it can be depended upon as a matter of certainty, it does not bring the Daguerreotypist into notice and his establishment into a successful run of business. Such an establishment, with rooms of convenient location, instruments the best, operators of pleasant personal address and accomplished in their art, and what follows as a consequence, admirable likenesses-- is to be found in that of Messrs. Shew & Marks, Colvin building; which, during the absence of Mr. Shew, (in California,) will be conducted by his partner, Mr. Marks. BA, April 5, 1849.

SIEGFRIED,___________, daguerreotypist.

19 E. Baltimore (1855); advertised that he was "Late of Mr. Walzl's." TS, February 22, 1855. (see John H. Walzl)

SIMMONS & WOLCOTT, daguerreotypists.

199 W. Baltimore (1845). CD.

SMITH, T.O., daguerreotypist.

Mentioned as the former principal operator of Root's Gallery in Philadelphia, he was employed in Solomon N. Carvalho's Gallery of Fine Arts, 205 Baltimore (1849). BA, May 28, 1849. (see Solomon N. Carvalho)

STARR, JAMES, daguerreotypist.

Born in Maryland, 1838; living in the 10th Ward. USC 1860.

STEVENS, A.L., daguerreotypist.

Advertisement for gallery on corner of Broadway & Eastern Ave. TS, September 27, 1854.

STEVENSON, JOHN G., daguerreotypist.

Advertisement for his arrival In Baltimore from Washington, D.C. to make "Daguerreotype Likenesses." AD, BA, October 14, 1840.

STILTZ, D.R., daguerreotypist, photographer.

159 W. Baltimore (1856-1857); 82 S. Sharp (1858-1859); 244 Baltimore (1859); "View Photographers, office at Butler, Perrigo & Way's, 108 W. Baltimore, upstairs" (1864); Williamsport, Pa. (1875); former operator for J.H. Whitehurst. CD, TS, imprint on carte de visite, AC, PP.

SZABO, SAMUEL G., daguerreotypist.

Boarding at 29 Holliday (1858). CD.


THOMAS, EDWIN, daguerreotypist.

Over 125 Baltimore (1849-1850). CD.

THOMLINSON & PARDRE, daguerreotypists.

Advertisement for gallery at 10 N. Charles. TS, April 26, 1845.

TUCKER, JOSEPH, daguerreotypist.

Born In Washington, D.C., 1797; 131 1/2 W. Baltimore (1855-1857); 465 W. Baltimore (1858-1864); 466 W. Baltimore (1863-1864).

USC 1860, CD, BD.

TUCKER, WESLEY A., daguerreotypist.

Born in Maryland, 1828; over 101 Baltimore (1851); $500 invested, 200 plates on hand, 2 mate employees, $60 average monthly labor cost, 2000 likenesses produced annually. USC 1850, CD, USMC 1850.

TUCKER, WILLIAM A., daguerreotypist.

101 Baltimore, dw 20 S. Howard (1853-1854). CD.

TUTTLE, ELISHA, daguerreotypist, photographer.

Employed in the P.L. Perkins Gallery, cor. North & Baltimore (1854); 207 Baltimore (1858); 32 North (1860). BD, CD.


VALENTINE,______________, daguerreotypist.

Mentioned as the principal operator at the gallery of Woodbridge & Harris. TS, January 5, 1854.

VAN GANTT, T., daguerreotypist.

Operator for Jesse H. Whitehurst. PP.

*VANERSON, __________, daguerreotypist.

Mentioned as an operator for Whitehurst's Gallery, 207 Baltimore (1850). BA, September 21, 1850.


WAGNER, FERDINAND, daguerreotypist, photographer.

Born in Prussia, 1819; 300 N. Gay (1858-1859); 63 W. Baltimore (1863-1886); 427 E. Baltimore (1887-1889); 419 E. Baltimore (1894-1904); and Son (1874-1904). USC 1870, CD.

WAGNER, HENRY, daguerreotypist, photographer.

220 Light (1858-1864); $300 capital invested; 1 male employee, $60 average monthly labor cost, 3000 likenesses produced yearly valued at $1600. CD, USMC 1860.

WALZL, JOHN H., daguerreotypist, photographer, photographic supplies dealer.

63 Baltimore (June 1854-1860); and 19 E. Baltimore (October 1855-1860); over 213 W. Baltimore (September 1860-1864); dealer in photographic stock, 25 Holliday (1867-1868); over 77 W. Baltimore (1868-1869). TS, CD, BD.

WEEDEN, E.B., daguerreotypist.

Advertisement for gallery "next door to Dr. Mokur" in East Baltimore. TS, October 21, 1854.

WELDEN, HOLHAM F., daguerreotypist.

Born In Maryland, 1813; living in 4th Ward. USC 1860.

WELDEN, WILLIAM F., daguerreotypist.

Born in Maryland, 1843; living in the 7th Ward. USC 1860.

WHEEDON, EUGENE BEAUHARNAIS, daguerreotypist, ambrotypist.

135 S. Broadway (1856-1859); and 464 W. Baltimore (1856-1857); corner Broadway & Bank (1859); and Son (1856-1859). BD, CD, TS, September 23, 1859.

WHITEHILL, LOUIS (LEWIS), daguerreotypist, photographer.

163 N. Gay (1856-1859); 282 N. Gay (1863-1864); 300 N. Gay (1871). CD, BD.

WHITEHURST, JESSE HARRISON, daguerreotypist, photographer, entreprenuer.

Born in Princess Anne County, Virginia, 1823; died in Baltimore, September 8, 1875; 207 1/2 Baltimore (June 1849-1851); 205 Baltimore (July 1851- September 1857); 213 Baltimore (October 1857- April 1860); 123 Baltimore (May 1860-1864); $6000 Invested, 500 plates on hand, 6 male employees, $184 average monthly labor cost, 6500 likenesses produced yearly. USC 1870, TS, CD, USMC 1850.

Labels: Embossed case pad "J.H. WHITEHURST GALLERIES/ NEW YORK/ WASHINGTON D.C./ BALTIMORE/ RICHMOND/ NORFOLK/ PETERSBURG/ LYNCHBURG' and blind-stamped mat "WHITEHURST"; gold stamped Mascher patent stereo case "FROM J. H. WHITEHURST/S DAGUERREAN ROOMS, NO. 205 BALTIMORE STREET, BALTIMORE" with mat blind-stamped "WHITEHURST"

A NEW AND EXTENSIVE PREMIUM DAGUERREAN GALLERY, (OVER R. & A. CAMPBELLIS JEWELRY STORE,) 205 BALTIMORE STREET-- This Gallery is over 100 feet deep, with 10 rooms. A splendid Exhibition Saloon-- a Ladies' Parlor and Toilet Room, with three large Sky-lights, one built expressly for copying Daguerreotypes, Paintings, &c., making it one of the most complete and costly establishments of the kind in the country, where may be obtained highly finished and beautiful DAGUERREOTYPES, in all weather, though cloudy is preferable, except for Children, as it aids the artist in avoiding the unpleasant scowl which otherwise often mars the beauty of Daguerreotypes. TS, September 23, 1851.

WILDE, J.F.W., daguerreotypist.

43 Hampstead Rd. which was probably a residence (1851-1854). CD.

WILLIAMS, JOHN T., daguerreotypist.

Over 211 Baltimore (1851); York, Pennsylvania (1856); $1000 Invested, 250 plates on hand, 2 male employees, $100 average monthly labor cost, 3000 likenesses produced annually. CD, TS, USMC 1850.

WINCHESTER, O.F., daguerreotypist.

Advertisement for gallery at 163 Baltimore. TS, August 4, 1843.

WINTER, HENRY, daguerreotypist.

578 W. Baltimore (1864-1866). CD.

WOLCOTT, WILLIAM K., daguerreotypist.

217 W. Baltimore (1845). CD.

WOODBRIDGE, JOHN J., daguerreotypist.

and Harris, 244 Baltimore (1854); Woodbridge only (1855-1856).

TS, CD.

THE TWENTY-FIVE CENT DAGUERREOTYPE, BY WOODBRIDGE & HARRIS, 244 BALTIMORE STREET.

Where is the ]over who, from his fond heart,

Pays not a tribute to Daguerrean art?

He sees the face that lightens all his fate

Transfixed by light, and shining from a plate.

Still o'er the plate his greedy optics roll,

And on its contents feasts his hungering soul.

TS, January 27, 1854.





ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ross J. Kelbaugh's interest in the Civil War was first piqued while still in elementary school by the beginning of the Centennial celebrations of the early 1960s. He soon acquired his first cartes de visite of Union and Confederate soldiers as part of his general collecting of relics from the period. Mr. Kelbaugh was awarded a BA from the University of Maryland and a MLA from Johns Hopkins University and retired in 2001 from teaching American history at Catonsville High School in Baltimore County, Maryland. In recognition of his contributions in the field, he was selected as "Teacher-Historian of 1988" by the United States Capitol Historical Society in Washington, D.C. He also received the E.W.Peterkin Award from the U.S. National Park Service for his work in furthering the appreciation and study of American history. Today he specializes in collecting and researching nineteenth century Maryland photography as part of his interest in early American images and has written and lectured extensively on the subject. Mr. Kelbaugh is author of the Introduction to Civil War Photography, Introduction to African American Photographs, 1840-1900 as well as the Directory of Maryland Photographers, 1839-1900, the first reference ever produced on this state's photographic industry. He is also publisher of the multi-volume Directory of Civil War Photographers. In 2006, Mr. Kelbaugh was guest curator of the Maryland Historical Society's exhibit "The Civil War in Maryland: An Exhibit of Rare Photographs" and wrote the catalogue for this landmark photographics exhibit. See our Publications site for more information about purchasing any of these books.




Return to Historic Graphics Homepage