A Woman's Work



With the advent of the Industrial Revolution, women increasingly found themselves leaving home and entering the workplace in both traditional domestic related employment and in the new factories sprouting along America's landscape. In addition, new technology began to find its way into the home forever altering life as well. The new medium of photography soon became the democratic means for citizens, no matter how humble, to record themselves for posterity, and portraits that presented subjects in a manner that reflected their life's work became popular. Men are usually found in these "occupationals," but women, whether in the photographer's studio or at the work site, left a visual record of their jobs too. Housekeepers, servants, seamstresses, teachers, washerwomen, factory workers, or even telephone operators are among these proud occupational portraits left by woman of the Victorian era. So enjoy this brief look at "A Woman's Work" from the past recorded in a style that has virtually disappeared from America's photography studios today, and let us know your reaction.to these records of a time long since gone.



Click on image to see an enlargement

"Le Plus Ultra" Machine
Sixth-plate Ambrotype

The Milliner
Sixth-plate Daguerreotype

Maria Boyd, Weaver
Ninth-plate Daguerreotype

The Washwoman
Sixth-plate Ambrotype

The Seamstress
Carte de Visite

Cigar Box Makers
Tintype

Box Makers
Tintype

The Washwoman
Carte de Visite

The Housekeeper
Cabinet Card

Housekeeper Ann
Carte de Visite

The Taylor Shop
Carte de Visite

Telephone Operator
Cabinet Card

Servants
Cabinet Card

Seamstresses
Ninth-plate Ambrotype

The Teacher
Quarter-plate Ambrotype

The Laundry
Cabinet Card

©Historic Graphics 1999-2009; images may not be reproduced without the written permission of Historic Graphics.




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