Lecture Audience

Ross J. Kelbaugh, a retired teacher of American history in the Baltimore County Public Schools, is founder and CEO of Historic Graphics, LLC, a vintage image sales and services company in Baltimore, Maryland, established in 1983. His publications include Introduction to Civil War Photography; Directory of Maryland Photographers, 1839-1900; the Directory of Civil War Photographers; Introduction to African American Photographs, 1840-1950; and The Civil War in Maryland: A Catalogue of Rare Photographs which accompanied the landmark exhibit he guest curated at the Maryland Historical Society in 2006. This exhibit also featured many images from the Kelbaugh Collection which were publicly exhibited for the first time. Photographs from his extensive collection have been widely published and were selected for use in the permanent exhibits of the Reginald F. Lewis Maryland Museum of African- American History and Culture as well as the Maryland Sports Heroes at Camden Yards museum. Groups that have hosted his popular programs have included the Maryland Historical Society, Frederick County Historical Society, Jewish Historical Society of Maryland, Baltimore County Genealogical Society, Howard County Genealogical Society, Baltimore Civil War Round Table, Chesapeake Antiquarian Photographic Society, Baltimore Camera Club, Central New York Civil War Round Table, Company of Military Historians, The Civil War Artifact Forum, and the Image of War Seminar of The Center for Civil War Photography. Please contact us for more information about fees and scheduling dates.

From Daguerreotypes to Digitial Prints: The Identification, Research and Care of Family Photographs

Using photographs from the Kelbaugh Collection, audiences learn about the inventors, processes, procedures and formats that helped create the family photographic archives spanning from the beginning of the medium in 1840 through today's digital photography. Examples of daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, tintypes, and the variety of paper photographic formats are shared with audiences giving them actual "hands on" access to artifacts that will enable them to better date their own family photographs. Discussions also include internet as well as other resources that can be used to research photographs. Recommendations for the care and preservation of each type of photographic medium are discussed as well. Audiences are encouraged to bring family photographs for evaluation by Mr. Kelbaugh at the end of his formal presentation. Reference publications and conservation materials are also made available for purchase. Program length: 1 1/2 hours

Photography in Civil War Baltimore: A Model for Researching Photographs

Caught between southern sympathy and Northern determination, the citizens of Baltimore found themselves in a position unique for any city of the Union during the Civil War. This program first audiences a non-technical overview of the practice of photography and the common types of photographs produced during the Civil War era. Then the story of the major photographs and their makers in the Monumental City from the blood shed by the first Confederate and African-American casualties of the Civil War, to the arrest of photographers and regulation of the photography industry, through the banning of the images up until even the war's end is told in through a dramatic narrative accompanied by many rare photographs drawn from the Kelbaugh Collection and other private resources. The program also gives a "behind the scenes" look at the variety of primary source resources used to uncover these stories that can be used by audience members to research their own Civil War photographs. Program Length: 1 hour

A House Divided: Maryland Civil War Photography Exposed

The Old Line State of Maryland was in a unique position during the Civil War. With a population of divided loyalties, the state was quickly placed under military control at the very beginning of the war to prevent its secession. This gave the photography industry the opportunity to record some of the most important photographs of the Civil War, as well as capture the faces of both sides of the conflict. From the first Confederate and African-American casualties, the first extensively photographed military camps and fortifications, and the first photographs of American dead on a battlefield, the stories of the photographers, their images and their dramas are recounted in this lively program. Over 100 rare photographs from the Kelbaugh Collection and other private resources are featured to tell this compelling story. Program Length: 1 hour

Guide to American Military Photographs, 1840-1920

One of the hottest areas in collecting today continues to be photographs of soldiers and military scenes. Spanning the evolution of photography's beginnings in the 1840s with the daguerreotype through the advent of flexible film and Kodak cameras of the World War I era, this program introduces audiences to all of the popular formats used during the medium's evolution to record America's fighting men and women. Using more than 100 rare photographs from the Kelbaugh Collection and other resources that record the Mexican War, Civil War, Indian Wars, Spanish-American War, Philippine Insurrection to World War One, audiences learn about the formats and subjects of military photographs that were made during this era, sources for researching & purchasing military photographs, and what types of images are most desirable for collecting. Program Length: 1 hour

Introduction to African American Photographs, 1840-1950

Another important area in photography research and collecting today focuses on African American photographs. This program examines the images of blacks before and behind the camera lens spanning from photography's beginnings in the 1840s with the daguerreotype through the advent of flexible film and gelatin silver prints. More than 100 rare photographs from the Kelbaugh Collection are used to introduce audiences to the formats and subjects of photographs that were made during this era. Sources for researching & viewing African American photographs and the types of images are most desirable for collecting are also discussed. Discussions also include the care and preservation of antique photographs and modern digital images as well. Audiences are encouraged to bring family photographs for verbal evaluation by Mr. Kelbaugh at the end of his formal presentation. Program Length: 1 hour


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